Caryl Stern
Child Advocate and Civil Rights Activist


Caryl M. Stern has spent more than thirty years in the non-profit sector as a child advocate and civil rights activist. Since May 2007, she’s served as President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, leading the day-to-day work of the organization’s National Office and five Regional Offices. Prior to this and other roles at the U.S. Fund, Stern served as the Chief Operating Officer and Senior Associate National Director for the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). She is the author of I Believe in ZERO, an account of her experiences at UNICEF and a call for everyone to see the world’s children as their own. She lives with her family in New York.

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I Believe in ZEROLearning from the World's Children
St. Martin's Griffin

First-hand, human stories of hope, resilience, determination, and family: a call to see the world's children as our own, by the President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

In I Believe in ZERO, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF Caryl M. Stern draws on her travels around the world, offering memorable stories that present powerful and sometimes counter-intuitive lessons about life. I Believe in ZERO reflects her—and UNICEF's—mission to reduce the number of preventable deaths of children under the age of five from 19,000 each day to zero.

A Conversation with Caryl Stern Caryl draws on decades of experience as a child advocate and civil and human rights activist to inspire audiences to work toward a better world. Her speech topics include Kids helping Kids, children and philanthropy, anti-bullying, and international development.


Read Caryl’s Time Magazine op-ed with Naomi Post

Check out Caryl’s HuffPost Women in Business Q&A

Read Caryl’s CNN op-ed on refugee children

Praise for I Believe in ZERO

“A powerfully written, heartbreaking account of making sure that all children have the opportunity to “dream big dreams and have a fighting chance to realize those dreams.”
Kirkus Review

“Stern’s ability to bridge diverse cultures, language barriers, and economic circumstances through simple commonalities—she relates to women in Africa as a mother and gains insight into the experience of displaced persons from her Jewish heritage—is the greatest of many lessons she offers to those wanting to help children in crisis.”
Publisher's Weekly

"Caryl Stern is one of the world’s great mothers. While travelling with Caryl on a UNICEF field visit, I saw firsthand the incredible love she has for ALL of the world's children. Her stories force us to realize that every child, not just our own, deserves the right to live a healthy, happy life.”
—Tyson Chandler