Anne Fadiman
Award-winning Writer, Essayist, Editor, and Writer-in-Residence at Yale


Anne Fadiman is the author of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, winner of a National Book Critics Circle Award, an L.A. Times Book Prize, and a Salon Book Award. The book explores the clash between a small county hospital in California and a refugee family from Laos over the care of Lia Lee, a Hmong child diagnosed with severe epilepsy. She is also the author of two essay collections, At Large and At Small and Ex Libris, and the editor of Rereadings: Seventeen Writers Revisit Books They Love. Her essays and articles have appeared in Harper’s, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. She is the Francis Writer-in-Residence at Yale.

 

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The Spirit Catches You and You Fall DownA Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures
Farrar, Straus and Giraux

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down explores the clash between a small county hospital in California and a refugee family from Laos over the care of Lia Lee, a Hmong child diagnosed with severe epilepsy.

Paperback,eBook
At Large and At SmallFamiliar Essays
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

In At Large and At Small, Anne Fadiman returns to one of her favorite genres, the familiar essay—a beloved and hallowed literary tradition recognized for both its intellectual breadth and its miniaturist focus on everyday experiences.

Paperback,eBook
RereadingsSeventeen writers revisit books they love
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Is a book the same book—or a reader the same reader—the second time around? The seventeen authors in this witty and poignant collection of essays all agree on the answer: Never.

Paperback
Ex LibrisConfessions of a Common Reader
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Perfectly balanced between humor and erudition, Ex Libris establishes Fadiman as one of our finest contemporary essayists.

A Conversation with Anne Fadimen



Praise for The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

"Ms. Fadiman tells her story with a novelist’s grace, playing the role of cultural broker, comprehending those who do not comprehend each other and perceiving what might have been done or said to make the outcome different."
The New York Times

"Some writers. . . have done exceedingly well at taking in one or another human scene, then conveying it to others — James Agee, for instance. . . and George Orwell. . . It is in such company that Anne Fadiman’s writing belongs."
Robert Coles